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Testimonials

Here are some of our public endorsements and comments from the initial installation of There But Not There, which inspired the nationwide project.
It was very moving and I can see them [the 51 villagers who died in the War] appearing and disappearing, almost vanishing and very ghostly. It is brilliant. I only wish more people could see it.

Martin Milmo

Ultra-creative thinking of remembering those who gave our lives for our freedom, we were, and are, so in awe of what you presented. It really did feel as if the fallen were there with us, you achieved a new and different level of respect.

Geoff and Marijke

It was amazing. The children were really taken with it - looking at the names, finding relatives, wanting to know what was a “driver”, was a private higher than a sergeant, where had these men lived, had they lived in our house. So many questions!

I think as sadly the men who served in the two world wars will shortly no longer be with us, we need to find new ways to connect the next generation with the world wars and this does exactly that.

It’s a fabulous way of honouring these men and when you see how they nearly fill the church, the horror of the first world war is really made clear.

Jenny Perry

A truly beautiful, moving and evocative memorial. It really brings it home. Wow!

Clare Himmer

I spent some time quietly in church.... the sun was shining and the church empty and quiet and I found the most amazing peace and beauty just sitting with these men. Thank you for a fitting tribute to those who gave us so much.

Caroline Sturdey

What an extraordinarily moving piece. Really perfectly evoking those absent friends. I was moved to tears.

I will try and hold in my mind my first impression of those quiet souls seated in the pews. A perfect resonance of all I feel about Remembrance Day.

Bridget Harris

Without mental health, there is no health.

Dr Melanie Abas, MBChB, MSc, MRCP, MRCPsych, MPhil, MD
Reader in Global Mental Health and Deputy Director, Centre for Global Mental Health, King's College London

Thanks to the Installation, every time we go past, my son asks me about the war, why we went to war, about the soldiers. I thought it might be a bit beyond him at the time as he was just 3, but clearly it had a lasting impact.

I believe that every child should be taken to see the war fields at some point, but this seems to be the next best thing to capture the imagination - which is amazing.

Rebecca Rose Reeves, Fordcombe

Patron
As Patron of the There But Not There project, I strongly commend this initiative as a most compelling way to remember the Fallen of the First World War as our national centenary commemoration comes to its conclusion in November 2018.

General the Lord Dannatt GCB CBE MC DL

We then went in again on Sunday evening, on our way home, and neither of us could speak. We both sat with a soldier and conversed silently. A beautiful experience. Incredibly sad, but incredible at the same time

Mel Thomas

There But Not There